Regulator blocks Danske Bank’s pick for chief executive after €200bn scandal

first_imgThe report found that employees of Danske Bank likely colluded with customers to avoid anti-money laundering controls.Danske faces multiple separate probes, including a criminal investigation in Estonia and, more worryingly for investors, an investigation by the US Department of Justice, which has a track record of imposing large fines for money laundering offences.The Danske board is “in dialogue with other potential candidates and will now continue the recruitment process in order to find the best possible person for the position,” said Ole Andersen, Danske’s chairman.“The Board of Directors unanimously backed Jacob Aarup-Andersen as new CEO, knowing full well that longer experience in certain areas would have been desirable,” he said.The rejected candidate said he is “proud and happy” with the “strong sign of recognition” from the board, but “noted” the FSA’s reasoning.Read more: Danske Bank appoints interim boss after €200bn money laundering scandal whatsapp Wednesday 17 October 2018 12:24 pm Regulator blocks Danske Bank’s pick for chief executive after €200bn scandal whatsapp Jasper Jolly center_img The Danish Financial Supervisory Authority (FSA) turned down the appointment as chief executive of the bank’s head of wealth management, Jacob Aarup-Andersen, because of lack of experience, Danske Bank said in a statement today.The bank, which has branches in the UK as well as a Northern Irish note issuing licence, said it has withdrawn the application and will continue its search for a new chief executive.Read more: Danske Bank faces US probe over €200bn money laundering scandalDanske’s previous boss, Thomas Borgen, resigned last month after presiding over lax controls in the bank’s Estonian branch. The branch, which was added when Danske acquired Sampo Bank in 2007, let €200bn flow through suspicious accounts.An investigation carried out by a law firm into the anti-money laundering controls found red flags on “almost all” of the customers in the bank’s non-resident accounts, referring in large part to Russian money. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutWTFactsHe Used To Be Handsome In 81s Now It’s Hard To Look At HimWTFactsJustPerfact USAMan Decides to File for Divorce After Taking a Closer Look at This Photo!   JustPerfact USAInvestment GuruRemember Cote De Pablo? Take A Deep Breath Before You See Her NowInvestment Guruzenherald.comDolly Finally Took Off Her Wig, Fans Gaspedzenherald.comDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily Funny Tags: Trading Archive Danish authorities have blocked the appointment of a new chief executive at Danske Bank, piling more misery on the firm which is reeling from a €200bn (£176bn) money laundering scandal. Sharelast_img read more

An e-citizenship scheme would put the UK at the heart of global trade

first_imgThere would be no greater testament to the government’s commitment to free trade and global Britain than inviting entrepreneurs from around the world to benefit from the business culture of the UK — and few better ways of offering British companies a chance to help the most rapidly growing firms in the world to prosper. Main image credit: Getty Opinion In looking to champion free trade and lead the charge towards global prosperity, the UK can offer no greater advantage to would-be entrepreneurs around the world than extending its economic and legal credibility. No other G7 nation offers such an opportunity to trade, build businesses, establish trusted relationships and find finance.  whatsapp We are increasingly aware of the link between prosperity and entrepreneurship: the societies that become prosperous are those that offer businesses, both large and small, the best possible chance of success.   According to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, just 8.9 per cent of the world’s population was involved in some sort of startup business in 2001. By 2016, that figure was 14 per cent.  If we could find a way to break down these barriers and support global entrepreneurship, the results could be staggering. So what if individuals with entrepreneurial spirit were able to launch businesses in the UK, no matter where in the world they reside, and trade globally, benefiting from international trust in English law and British corporate governance? Britain’s legal system and financial institutions are among the most trusted in the world. We are not only home to Europe’s financial services industry and its largest capital markets, but we also dominate in related fields such as accountancy and legal services. The British common law system is such an asset that other countries with aspirations for growth have taken to replicating it wholesale, importing British legal experts to ensure the integrity of their business ecosystem. Ours is also the international language of business. The Chinese government has said that from Sunday it will no longer recognise the BNO passport for Hong Kong residents (Getty Images) Robyn StaveleyRobyn Staveley is head of communications at the Centre for Policy Studies A British e-citizenship scheme would give overseas entrepreneurs access to that unique business landscape, and to the financing and investment that comes with it. Above all, e-citizens would be able to demonstrate they are trustworthy and reputable. Even where there is honest government and competent administration, startups don’t always have access to the capital or professional services that could see them meet their full potential. These barriers are particularly acute when firms seek to leave their home markets and expand across borders. The idea is similar to the Estonian e-residency scheme, which has led to more than 62,000 applications and established more than 10,000 Estonian companies. Sproule sets out two distinct but interconnected proposals, which taken together could put the UK at the heart of the global trade in services and ideas — and support and stimulate entrepreneurship in countless corners of the world. Going Global: How to make the UK the champion of worldwide entrepreneurship is published by the Centre for Policy Studies and can be read here.center_img City A.M.’s opinion pages are a place for thought-provoking views and debate. These views are not necessarily shared by City A.M. The global population of startups and entrepreneurs is on the rise. The Chinese government has said that from Sunday it will no longer recognise the BNO passport for Hong Kong residents (Getty Images) Also Read: An e-citizenship scheme would put the UK at the heart of global trade Tuesday 28 July 2020 5:04 am Moreover, this system would also put UK-based firms in the best position possible to benefit from business with high-growth entrepreneurial parts of the world. In the most entrepreneurial countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, startups can employ up to 40 per cent of the working age population. Globally, the number of early stage entrepreneurs had risen from 254 million at the turn of the millennium to 469 million by 2015/16.  whatsapp However, the inconvenient truth is that there are still far too many places in the world where starting a company — and, indeed, doing business generally — are far harder than they ought to be. Corruption and maladministration stifle entrepreneurship and create an environment where trading freely within a country, let alone outside it, simply isn’t possible.  An e-citizenship scheme would put the UK at the heart of global trade A new “e-citizenship” scheme would provide an identity document backed by the UK state to eligible entrepreneurs, giving them a definitive proof of identity trusted anywhere in the world and allowing them to participate more fully in an online, globalised economy. “E-businesses”, meanwhile, would enable trusted e-citizens to engage in trade and establish companies in Britain — all without the need to establish physical residency in the UK. Share In Going Global, a new report published by the Centre for Policy Studies this week, former senior adviser to the Prime Minister James Sproule argues for just that. Show Comments ▼last_img read more

High school seniors take spotlight in Juneau elementary schools

first_imgCommunity | Juneau | Juneau Schools | SpiritHigh school seniors take spotlight in Juneau elementary schoolsMay 28, 2017 by Quinton Chandler, KTOO Share:Juneau-Douglas seniors walk through Harborview Elementary School on Friday. (Photo courtesy Juneau School District)The Juneau-Douglas High School seniors are eating a barbecue lunch after visiting Gastineau and Harborview Elementary schools this morning. The seniors donned their caps and gowns and took a victory lap through the schools. The walkthroughs are supposed to inspire the school district’s younger kids to graduate.Rena Nauer and Sierra Ezrre were eating lunch together but this morning they paraded through different schools. Nauer visited the kids at Gastineau.“They (were) excited and I went to school there so it was kind of cool getting to do it as a senior and going back,” Nauer said.She thinks the walk was a good idea because it was fun and it might have a positive impact on the younger kids.“It’s probably, like, cool getting to see the older kids, like, realizing that’s where you’re going to want to be when you’re older and be, like, ‘Oh my God, that’s going to be me soon,’” she said. “So maybe they’re just, like, looking forward to it.”Rena Nauer, left, and Sierra Ezzre in the Juneau-Douglas High School Commons on Friday. Photo by Quinton Chandler/KTOO)Sierra Ezzre visited Harborview – also her old school. She agrees with Nauer because she admired older kids when she was in elementary school.“Yeah, I definitely looked up to them. Like, I thought they were so cool when I was little,” Ezzre said. “So, for us to go do that, I think that’s really important to them because I feel like quite a few of them look up to us.”The girls just cut to the heart of the reason for this new tradition. JDHS Assistant Principal Kim McNamara said Juneau educators plan to keep doing this every year to make sure the younger kids remember what graduation looks like.“The Gastineau kids had their yearbooks ready, they were asking all of the seniors to sign their yearbooks,” McNamara said. “The Harborview kids were equally enthusiastic, lining the halls, giving high-fives, cheering. It was really inspiring.”Juneau schools first considered doing this last year after they learned other school districts were doing it in the Lower 48. They didn’t get a chance to do it in Juneau until now.Juneau-Douglas Assistant Principal Kim McNamara leads the school’s seniors to Harborview Elementary School on Friday. (Photo courtesy Juneau School District)McNamara said these walkthroughs were also meaningful for the seniors.“Especially the ones that went back to their elementary school,” she said. “It was really meaningful for them to walk through the halls, think back to their experiences as a younger child, and see some of their teachers and be able to connect with them again.”She said it was a chance for the seniors to reflect on where they came from as they take their final steps out of high school into their next chapter.The Juneau-Douglas seniors weren’t the only ones who held walkthroughs. Thunder Mountain High School seniors held a similar one at Riverbend Elementary School on Friday.JDHS, TMHS and Yaakoosge Daakahidi are all holding their graduation ceremonies Sunday.Share this story:last_img read more

Geologist explains how ‘West Captiva’ sandbar formed & if it’s here to stay

first_imgAdvertisementTags: CaptivaFlorida Gulf Coast UniversityGulf of Mexico AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementOver the past few weeks, the popular sand bar has grown, attracting both birds, and boaters alike. But how did it get there? Florida Gulf Coast University Geology Professor Michael Savarese has an idea.“I would call it an Island sitting on an Ebb tidal delta. So, when the tidal current slows down, whatever sediment it is picking up, it will deposit. So these loose sands, these shoals, that delta is driven by this tidal current,” Savarese said. Officials warn holes left on Captiva beach endanger wildlife May 10, 2021 In laymen’s terms, a pile of sand put there by the tide. But, the same tidal current that created it could just as easily take it away. When that might be all depends. “It may exist in its current state for days, weeks, months or even years, but the dynamics mean it is unlikely to exist for an extended period of time,” Savarese said. AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments No development expected off Texas coast May 24, 2021 NHC: 90% chance of tropical development in southwest Gulf of Mexico June 16, 2021 Advertisement ‘Rad dad’ to bad dad: Criminal couple steals Costas on Captiva May 8, 2021 CAPTIVA, Fla. — Most Southwest Florida natives know of Sanibel and Captiva, and even North Captiva Islands.But have you ever heard of West Captiva? Chances are you haven’t. Over the past week, locals said an already established sand bar has become even more noticeable. “It seemed fairly solid. The thing we questioned was that was it a tidal island? Would it disappear at certain times of the day, then reappear other times? But we came back out for a second go at it today and it’s still here.” Jacqui Bishop Klee, a boater out of Captiva, said. Advertisementlast_img read more

Laois actor confirms hit Netflix show to return for second series

first_img Facebook Electric Picnic TAGSNetflixRobert SheehanUmbrella Academy Laois actor Robert Sheehan has confirmed that his hit Netflix show ‘Umbrella Academy’ is to return for a second series.The first season was set in 1989, when 43 unconnected women inexplicably gives birth to 43 infants, after showing no previous signs of pregnancy.Seven of them were adopted by a now deceased billionaire who would train them to save the world.The surviving six reunite after years of estrangement to solve the mystery of his death and prepare for an impending apocalypse.As well as Robert Sheehan, the show also stars Ellen Page, Tom Hopper, Emmy Raver-Lampton, David Castaneda, Aidan Gallagher, Cameron Britton and Mary J Blige.Sheehan, who previously starred in Love/Hate and Misfits, plays the role of Klaus Hargreeves (‘Number Four’) in the superhero show.He can speak to the dead and alongside his six siblings, tries to stop the approaching apocalypse.In a virtual reunion video, some of the aforementioned cast members recreate the fan-favourite dance scene from the first season in order to announce the drop date of season 2. Bizarre situation as Ben Brennan breaks up Fianna Fáil-Fine Gael arrangement to take Graiguecullen-Portarlington vice-chair role WhatsApp Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Twitter Home Lifestyle Laois actor confirms hit Netflix show to return for second series Lifestyle RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Electric Picnic center_img Laois actor confirms hit Netflix show to return for second series By Alan Hartnett – 23rd May 2020 Previous articleFr Paddy: Ascension a time to HopeNext articleThe Week That Was: The Top 10 stories of the past seven days Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Pinterest Set to the song ‘I Think We’re Alone Now’ by Tiffany, the cast recorded themselves dancing in their homes to reveal that the show will return to Netflix on July 31, 2020.Joining the cast for season two will be Yusuf Gatewood (The Originals), Marin Ireland (Homeland) and Ritu Arya (Humans).Check out the announcement below:SEE ALSO – Down Memory Lane – 1999: Champions League drama, Ian Robertson and the end of the road for Tony Cascarino Pinterest News Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival Twitter WhatsApplast_img read more

Kim Reappears after 23 Days at a Favorite Haunt

first_img SHARE News North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China News [imText1] There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest News RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img News AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] Kim Reappears after 23 Days at a Favorite Haunt Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following “paratyphoid” outbreak Facebook Twitter By Daily NK – 2012.07.02 1:47pm last_img read more

School closures may have wiped out a year of academic progress for pupils in Global South, study warns

first_imgSchool closures may have wiped out a year of academic progress for pupils in Global South, study warns As much as a year’s worth of past academic progress made by disadvantaged children in the Global South may have been wiped out by school closures during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers have calculated.Despite teachers’ best efforts, we know school closures have held up, or reversed, the progress of millions of children Ricardo Sabates The research, by academics from the University of Cambridge and RTI International, attempts to quantify the scale of learning loss that children from poor and marginalised communities in the Global South may have experienced, and the extent to which home support and access to learning resources could ameliorate it.While it is known that the education of these children has suffered disproportionately during the pandemic, it is much harder to measure exactly how much their academic progress has been impeded while schools have been closed.The researchers used data from Ghana to model the likely impact of closures for children in remote and deprived parts of that country. They found that on average, 66% of the learning gains made in foundational numeracy during the academic year are lost during three months out of school. The outcome is, however, far worse for children without adequate home learning resources or support.The authors suggest these findings provide a glimpse of a much wider pattern of learning loss that is being experienced by millions of disadvantaged children around the world.Co-author Ricardo Sabates, from the REAL Centre in the University’s Faculty of Education, said: “Despite teachers’ best efforts, we know school closures have held up, or reversed, the progress of millions of children. This study is one approach to estimate how much learning could have been lost, and how much worse this may have been for children from disadvantaged settings.”“These figures represent an estimate of learning loss for children who spent 3 to 4 months out of school. We expect that as schools remained closed for longer, losses could be higher. We also acknowledge the important support that many families and communities provided with supplementary learning, which may have in turn limited the potential loss overall.”The study built on earlier research that highlighted the significant learning losses that occur when certain groups of children in developing countries move from one academic year to the next, particularly those who change language of instruction, and disadvantaged girls.The researchers used data charting the progress of more than 1,100 students on Ghana’s Complementary Basic Education (CBE) programme between 2016 and 2018. This programme supports children aged eight to 14 who would not normally attend school, providing them with education in their own language and at flexible times. On completion, students are encouraged to enrol at a local government school, but the start of that school year occurs after a three-month gap, during which they receive no education.The researchers compared participants’ scores in foundational maths tests at four stages: when they started the CBE, when they finished, when they joined a government school, and after their first year in government school. They also accessed data about how much home learning support the students had – for example, whether they had books at home, or could seek help from an adult when struggling with homework.During the CBE programme, the students’ test scores improved, on average, by 27 percentage points. When they were tested again after the three-month gap, however, their scores had reduced by an average of 18 percentage points. Two-thirds of the gains these students had made during the previous academic year were therefore lost while they were out of school. The researchers argue that this is an upper estimate of the expected scale of loss during an equivalent period of school closures due to COVID-19. Fortunately, during the pandemic community efforts to enhance learning may have mitigated this effect for some children.In spite of this, they also found that the basic learning loss was compounded among children who lacked support to study at home. For example:Children without access to reading and learning resources at home (such as books) experienced a learning loss above 80%.Children who said that they never asked adults in their household for help experienced a learning loss of around 85%.Encouragingly, the study showed that in the first year of formal education, students not only recouped their learning loss, but improved, while the attainment gap between more and less advantaged students narrowed.In many countries, however, it is becoming clear that many disadvantaged students – especially marginalised groups such as disabled children and many girls – are not returning to school. Therefore, the researchers suggest supporting access to diverse forms of education for students from less-advantaged backgrounds. There is evidence to show that community-based programmes, for example, can enhance a range of learning skills for these children. “Learning at home and in communities has to be reimagined if rapid gains are to be achieved as we continue to face the COVID-19 situation,” the authors say.The pattern of learning loss charted in Ghana may also apply far beyond the Global South. “This is an international challenge,” said co-author Emma Carter, also from the REAL Centre. “In Europe and the US, children from lower socio-economic backgrounds will similarly be experiencing severe learning loss. The levels of attainment may differ between countries, but it is highly likely that the pattern of loss remains.”The evaluation data used in the study was commissioned and funded by FCDO Ghana. The research is published in the International Journal of Educational Development. /University Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Cambridge, children, community, disadvantaged, education, Europe, first year, Ghana, Government, pandemic, participants, research, resources, students, university, University of Cambridgelast_img read more

Latest COVID-19 information

first_imgLatest COVID-19 information A Victorian Government public health response is underway after cases of COVID-19 were found in the City of Whittlesea.Additional measures have been put in place to stop the spread.From 6pm on Tuesday 25 May:Masks must be worn indoors for everyone aged over 12 yearsNo more than 5 visitors to your home each dayNo more than 30 people in public gatherings.Exposure sites continue to be added to the Victorian Government’s website. Stay up to date at www.coronavirus.vic.gov.au/exposure-sitesUPDATED 4pm Tuesday 25 MayTier 1 – Get tested and quarantine for 14 daysJump! Swim School at 4/37 The Concord in Bundoora on 21 May between the hours of 8.55am and 10.15am. Nandos Epping (Dalton Rd) on 19 May from 8.30pm – 9.20pmWoolworths Epping North on 22 May from 4.45pm to 5.45pmMcDonalds Clifton Hill on 22 May from 6pm to 7pmSmiggle, Highpoint Shopping Centre on 20 May from 5.55pm to 6.30pmKidstuff, Highpoint Shopping Centre on 20 May from 5.20pm to 5.55pm Ishka, Highpoint Shopping Centre on 20 May from 5.45pm to 6.20pmLush, Highpoint Shopping Centre on 20 May from 6.05pm to 6.35pmToyworld, Highpoint Shopping Centre on 20 May from 5.30pm to 6.20pmBamboo House in Little Bourke St, Melbourne on 21 May from 11am to 11.50amTier 2 – Get tested and isolate until you receive a negative resultHighpoint Shopping Centre, all areas on levels 2 and 3 excluding specific shops listed as Tier on 20 May from 5.15pm to 6.35pmFutsal Brunswick on 23 May from 9am until 10amHouse and party store in Lyndarum Drive in Epping on 22 May from 5.15pm to 5.50pmEpping North Shopping Centre in Lyndarum Drive on 22 May from 4.45pm to 5.50pmPacific Epping Urban Diner Food Court on 23 May from 1.15pm to 2.30pmShell Coles Express Reservoir on 18 May from 3.15pm to 4.15pm B.T Connor Reserve in Reservoir on 21 May from 8pm to 11.30pmAldi Epping on 23 May from 6pm to 7.30pmChemist Deopt Epping at Pacific Epping on 23 May at 11.15am to 12pmAdams Reserve playground in Preston on 23 May from 2.15pm to 3.45pmAldi in Preston South on 23 May from 3.45pm to 4.25pm /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Aldi, Bourke, Clifton, Coles, coronavirus, covid-19, exposure, Government, local council, Melbourne, pacific, public health, quarantine, school, website, Whittlesea, Whittlesea City Council, Woolworthslast_img read more

Jamaica to be promoted as centre for International Financial Services

first_imgAdvertisements RelatedJamaica to be promoted as centre for International Financial Services Jamaica to be promoted as centre for International Financial Services JusticeMarch 7, 2011 RelatedJamaica to be promoted as centre for International Financial Services CONTACT: LATONYA LINTON FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail A Bill to establish the Jamaica International Financial Services Authority, for the promotion and development of Jamaica as a Centre for International Financial Services, was passed in the Senate on March 4. Minister of Justice and Leader of Government Business in the Senate, Senator Dorothy Lightbourne, who piloted the Bill,  explained that the Authority will market and promote Jamaica as a central point for international services. “In the exercise of this function, it is expected that the Ministry of Industry, Investment and Commerce will provide guidance and direction to the Authority, to ensure that its marketing efforts and strategies are consistent with that Ministry’s initiatives to promote the island and stimulate investment,” Senator Lightbourne said. She added that the Authority is expected to zealously guard and protect Jamaica’s reputation in the international financial marketplace, ensuring that at all times the island is seen as compliant with required international standards and that it is not perceived as a tax heaven or a facilitator of funds derived from illegal activities. The Authority is also expected to establish and maintain international linkages, aimed at positioning Jamaica’s international financial services sector on the global landscape. “The education of the public is also critical to this Authority. Unless all sectors of the local economy, as well as the general public are kept abreast of this initiative and are encouraged to play their part, it will not achieve the success that it is expected to achieve,” Senator Lightbourne said. In his remarks, Opposition Senator Mark Golding  said he was not pleased  with the Bill in its current state,  arguing that  the statutory body which the Bill will establish is little more than a promotional agency. Senator Golding  suggested that Jamaica would need a raft of modern, business-friendly legislation to create an enabling legal framework, inclusive of an International Business Companies Act, International Mutual Fund Legislation and legislation to facilitate offshore Trusts and offshore banking. He further noted that there is need for a tax framework that will encourage international investors to use Jamaica as their preferred jurisdiction for offshore transactions. In response, Senator Lightbourne said legislation was currently being drafted for the framework Mr. Golding mentioned. “I am advised that approximately eight Bills are now being drafted and a draftsperson has been specially retained, so that it is being fast tracked,” Senator Lightbourne said. The Bill was passed in the Houses of Representatives on February 1, 2011. RelatedJamaica to be promoted as centre for International Financial Serviceslast_img read more

Gov’t Developing Policy on Small Arms

first_img By LATONYA LINTON, JIS Reporter Gov’t Developing Policy on Small Arms National SecurityAugust 9, 2011 Advertisements RelatedGov’t Developing Policy on Small Arms RelatedGov’t Developing Policy on Small Arms RelatedGov’t Developing Policy on Small Arms FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail KINGSTON — The Ministry of National Security has employed the services of a consultant to develop a national policy on small arms, as the Government looks to arrest gun violence. Portfolio Minister, Senator Hon. Dwight Nelson, who made the disclosure during a forensic technology workshop held today August 9 at the Inter Faculty Lecture Theatre, University of the West Indies, Mona campus, said the consultant will also look at legislation on explosives and all firearms. He said that the policy, and the Organised Crime Bill, will provide the framework for the collection and use of crime scene evidence using the forensic technology. The bill has been completed and is to be sent to the legislative Committee of Cabinet for approval. The legislation, Minister Nelson informed, will specifically target gang activity, especially gang-related gun violence. “The combination of our policies and legislative framework should provide both the police and the prosecutors with the ability to garner substantial evidence that would lead to successful arrest and prosecution. We must do everything we can to enable the criminal justice system to work properly, to work faster and to work more effectively,” Senator Nelson said. The Minister said that there is growing concern regarding the prevalence of gun violence in Jamaica, while noting that in 2010, 76 per cent of the murders committed in Jamaica were carried out by the gun. In addition, 64 per cent of robberies last year were committed with guns. “It appears as if this trend is continuing in 2011. Between January and the end of July, 69 per cent of persons killed in Jamaica were killed with guns. Similarly, 66 per cent of robberies committed in Jamaica for the same period were committed with guns,” Senator Nelson said. He added that within the last two decades, there has been a proliferation of guns in the hands of criminals, which most often go undetected and are therefore unprosecuted. “The number of guns we recover each year is not commensurate, we don’t think, with the number of illegal guns out there. Last year, we recovered 685 illegal guns and we think this is a very small fraction of what currently exists in the hands of criminals, particularly those involved in organised crime, extortion, contract killing, human trafficking and the sale of weapons,” Senator Nelson said. He expressed the hope that the workshop will provide a blueprint that will assist in “breaking the unacceptable level of immunity that a significant number of gunmen have had over the years”. The one-day workshop has assembled a wide cross section of personnel involved in all things gun related, from processing crime scenes, furthering investigations to prosecutions. Based on the book ‘The 13 Critical Tasks: An Inside Out Approach to Solving More Gun Crime, author/presenter Pete Gagliardi provides an in-depth approach to the investigation of gun-related crimes.  Participants in the workshop will focus on the 13 critical tasks, which include: stakeholder management; programme integration; formalising understanding and enforcing directives; the comprehensive collection of evidence and data; the transfer of data and evidence for forensic processing; and the preliminary assessments and evaluation of evidence to provide information. Minister urged the participants “to make meaningful note of these 13 tasks and seek ways to apply them in the way you develop cases.last_img read more