Boris Johnson says City will thrive even if there’s a Brexit

first_img Tags: Boris Johnson Brexit People Boris Johnson has poured cold water on fears over the potentially damaging impact of  a Brexit on the City, also saying that London will continue to thrive as long as it invests in infrastructure.The incumbent London mayor shrugged off some business leaders’ concerns that exiting the European Union would be harmful to Britain, saying it wouldn’t make much difference to the future growth of the City. Read more: FCA’s Wheatley plays down fears of the UK leaving the EU”London will continue to thrive in or out of the EU although were would be [a] period of a lot of uncertainty,” he said in an interview with the Financial Times.”The stakes are lower for our generation than they were for the previous generation.””The 28 member states of the EU now make up 19 per cent of the world’s gross domestic product. We have huge engagement and interests in Europe, but big growth markets aren’t necessarily to be found in Europe.”Johnson stressed London’s future success was dependent on infrastructure investment such as ensuring there are transport links to join up new housing projects.Prime minister David Cameron is currently trying to renegotiate the terms of Britain’s membership to the EU. Once complete, British voters will vote on whether they want to remain in the EU in an “in out” referendum, which will take place before the end of 2017.Previous polls have suggested that the majority of business leaders want Britain to stay in the EU, nevertheless there was significant support for major reforms of the EU.Read more: Only one per cent of business leaders want Britain out of the EU Show Comments ▼ Jessica Morris Boris Johnson says City will thrive even if there’s a Brexit Sharecenter_img whatsapp whatsapp Monday 22 June 2015 4:32 amlast_img read more

News / FMC fires ‘collusion’ warning shot across the bows of transpacific carriers

first_img US ocean regulator the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) has fired a warning shot across the bows of container shipping lines, saying it will head to the courts if there is evidence of collusion on the transpacific trades.Freight rates between Asia and the east and west coast of the US have reached record highs in recent months and, following a closed meeting of FMC commissioners yesterday, the regulator said it was looking into possible infringements of competition law.“If there is any indication of carrier behaviour that might violate the competition standards in section 6(g) of the Shipping Act, the commission will immediately seek to address these concerns with the carriers.“If necessary, the FMC will go to federal court to seek an injunction to enjoin further operation of the non-compliant alliance agreement,” it said, adding that it had “heightened its scrutiny of markets, individual ocean carriers, and the three global carrier alliances in response to the unusual circumstances and challenges created by the Covid-19 pandemic”.It said it  had received “detailed reports that addressed trends in spot rates, longer-term service contracts, utilisation of equipment, blanked sailings, revenue trends, the policies of individual carriers and global alliances for service changes, as well as what notice must be provided to the FMC when there are blanked, cancelled or amended voyages.“The FMC is actively monitoring for any potential effect on freight rates and transport service levels, using a variety of sources and markers, including the exhaustive information that parties to a carrier agreement must file with the agency,” it added.While carriers have continued to restrict capacity, the transpacific trade has seen a surge in demand over the summer. Last week, Hackett Associates’ Global Port Tracker recorded US ports handling 1.92m teu in July, which although being down 2.3% year on year, was up 19.3% on June, “and significantly higher than the 1.76m teu forecast a month ago”.And it currently forecasts August’s throughput at 2.06m teu, which would be 6% higher than August last year and represent the highest monthly throughput on record, “beating the previous record of 2.04m teu set in October 2018”.Data from the port of Los Angeles supports this – it said this week that August container throughput was its highest ever, at 961,833 teu, which was up 12% year on year, and saw loaded imports breach the 500,000 teu mark for the first time.Meanwhile headhaul spot rates continue at historic highs: today’s World Container Index (WCI) from Drewry recorded a Shanghai-Los Angeles spot rate of $3,922 per 40ft, which Drewry said was 2% up on last week and a staggering year-on-year 182% increase.It is a similar situation on the Asia-US east coast trade, with today’s WCI Shanghai-New York reading $,716 per 40ft, up 3% week on week and 94% year on year.However, it appears carriers have begun to heed warnings from the FMC and China’s ministry of transport. This week, Ocean Alliance member OOCL announced it was reinstating six of nine previously announced blanked sailings on the transpacific slated to take place around the Golden Week holidays. By Gavin van Marle 17/09/2020last_img read more

The patient called me ‘colored girl.’ The senior doctor training me said nothing

first_img Molly Ferguson for STAT @JenniferAdaeze First OpinionThe patient called me ‘colored girl.’ The senior doctor training me said nothing Please enter a valid email address. Teaching medical students to challenge ‘unscientific’ racial categories Related: By Jennifer Adaeze Okwerekwu April 11, 2016 Reprints Again and again during my four years of training, I encountered racism and ignorance, directed either at patients or at me and other students of color. Yet it was very hard for me to speak up, even politely, because as a student, I felt I had no authority — and didn’t want to seem confrontational to senior physicians who would be writing my evaluations.advertisement Medicine struggles with a chronic disease: racism.Medical schools try to combat this disease with diversity initiatives and training in unconscious bias and cultural sensitivity. I’m about to graduate from the University of Virginia School of Medicine, so I’ve been through such programs.They’re not enough.advertisement An urgent call for diversity in medicine, ‘the profession I love’ To be truly inclusive, communities must be places where everyone feels they have equal worth and where people can have honest conversations without judgement. There’s not enough of that spirit in medical school, or in the medical profession.One more example among many: During my obstetrics and gynecology rotation, I helped perform a prenatal ultrasound on a woman wearing a Confederate flag shirt. Her husband and son watched. Both were wearing Confederate flag hats and belts.The optics of the encounter were jarring. I wondered if my patients hated me. Again, the attending physician did not address the racially charged awkwardness of the encounter.Although this physician was otherwise kind to me, his silence left me with a lasting impression. And too many toxic questions.As the Brazilian educator Paulo Freire writes, “Sometimes a simple, almost insignificant gesture on the part of a teacher can have a profound formative effect on the life of a student.” All these years later, I still wonder if these physicians — my teachers — respected me. It was difficult to reconcile the compassion they showed their patients with their apathy towards me.I needed to know if my experiences were anomalies, so I checked in with two well-respected black physicians who focus on diversity in academia. Dr. Marcus Martin, a vice president at the University of Virginia, and Dr. Eve Higginbotham, a vice dean at the University of Pennsylvania, both assured me that I wasn’t alone. In fact, they said such experiences were all too common.“It really is over the lifetime of one’s career that you ultimately understand how to actually deal with these very difficult situations,” Higginbotham said. Privacy Policy [email protected] Related: Leave this field empty if you’re human: A few hours later, when it was finally time to see this patient, the attending physician told me I had the pleasure of conducting my very first patient interview on “Amadou Diallo.”That was not his name. The only similarity between Amadou Diallo, the young man who was shot and killed by four New York City police officers in 1999, and this elderly Haitian gentleman was their skin color. My skin color.“That’s not his name,” I said, instinctively but respectfully.I was pointed in the direction of the patient and clinic, and proceeded as usual.center_img A few weeks later when I received my clinical evaluations, I perceived some of the feedback as unkind. I couldn’t tell if the comments actually reflected my performance or if I, too, was being punished for speaking out, or maybe even for being black. It was terrifying not knowing the difference.As my clinical training progressed, I had several opportunities to point out intolerance and injustice. I always chose amicability over advocacy. I didn’t want to jeopardize my grades and evaluations by calling attention to intolerance, so I stayed silent instead of voicing the values I believed in.During my internal medicine rotation a few months later, a patient called me a “colored girl” three times in front of the attending physician. The doctor did not correct the patient, nor did she address the incident with me privately.Despite all the other positive interactions I had with this teacher, her silence in this circumstance diminished my presence. I wondered if she thought of me as a “colored girl” too.Looking back, I don’t regret my timidity. It’s what I felt I needed to do to survive. But I feel angry and frustrated that my mentors in the medical profession didn’t raise these issues themselves. Diversity and inclusion initiatives challenge bias in the abstract. Checking bias in real-time, with real people, is much more challenging.Maybe they didn’t notice the bias. Maybe they didn’t feel it was important enough to talk about. Maybe they didn’t know how to talk about it.They should have. Jennifer Adaeze Okwerekwu Harvard Medical School students decry lack of diversity Related: These situations made me worry for our future: How can medical professionals address the needs of a rapidly diversifying population, when we cannot address prejudice within our own community?I did try, once, to speak up, but it didn’t end well. My first clinical rotation was in the ear, nose, and throat clinic. On my first day, I overheard the attending physician grumbling about accommodating an elderly Haitian man with limited English who had misunderstood his appointment time. “We’ll stick the med student on him,” he said. I was excited to test my skills, but I couldn’t help but feel that my seeing this patient was intended as a punishment for him — and that made me uncomfortable. Related: A patient threatened to shoot me. Could I then give him good care? About the Author Reprints Columnist, Off the Charts Jennifer Adaeze Okwerekwu is a psychiatrist and a columnist for STAT. Medical school often erodes aspiring doctors’ empathy, compassion, and idealism. As Harvard Medical School professor Dr. Richard Schwartzstein writes: “Typically, students enter medical school idealistic, eager to improve the human condition, and excited about becoming doctors. And then we do various things to change them.”This is most often the byproduct of the intense pressures of academic and clinical work. As a medical student, however, I fear my heart was hardened by an extra burden, of my educators being blind to my worth as a woman of color. As I advance in the training hierarchy and acquire students of my own, I will certainly do my best to foster inclusion. While my experience as a black medical student has made me hyperaware of racism in medicine, I know because I am human, that I have blind spots of my own.I will work to stay aware of tense moments. And I will always stand up for my students. I also hope I can cultivate a community where my students feel comfortable calling me out.Until we all commit to taking action every day to foster a true spirit of inclusion, we’ll risk perpetuating racial harms and undermining the true spirit of medical professionalism. I know race relations in medicine will not change overnight, but learning to see what is hidden in plain sight will be a crucial first step. Every one of us needs to own the principles that protect us and our patients from racism and bias. That means learning to see prejudice and speaking up against it. But that is far, far easier said than done. Newsletters Sign up for Morning Rounds Your daily dose of news in health and medicine. Tags Health Disparitiesmedical schoolphysicianracelast_img read more

First Look: Plumbing the mysteries of sweat to help burn patients cool their skin

first_img By Eric Boodman March 1, 2017 Reprints Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED @ericboodman STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. NEW YORK — Among the myriad traits separating humans from the unsophisticated hordes of lesser mammals, perhaps the least celebrated is our ability to sweat from hairy body parts.That neglect, it turns out, is undeserved. Perspiring at the crotch and the armpit might not have led to dominion over the fish in the sea, the birds in the sky, and all creeping things that creepeth upon the Earth — but understanding it could potentially lead to better treatments for those with severe burns. In the Lab What is it? GET STARTED Eric Boodman Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr.center_img General Assignment Reporter Eric focuses on narrative features, exploring the startling ways that science and medicine affect people’s lives. Dale de la Rey/AFP/Getty Images Log In | Learn More About the Author Reprints What’s included? [email protected] First Look: Plumbing the mysteries of sweat to help burn patients cool their skin Tags researchSTAT+last_img read more

The ‘Netflix’ model for hepatitis C drugs is saving Australia a lot of money

first_img @Pharmalot Pharmalot Tags drug pricespharmaceuticalsSTAT+ Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. [email protected] The ‘Netflix’ model for hepatitis C drugs is saving Australia a lot of money Ed Silverman What’s included? Log In | Learn More STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.center_img Laura Morton for STAT Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Subscribing to the so-called Netflix model for purchasing hepatitis C treatments is projected to lower patient costs by approximately 85 percent in Australia, where the government is working its way through a five-year deal in which several drug makers were paid a lump sum of $766 million for the medicines, according to an analysis in the New England Journal of Medicine.Under emerging Netflix models — which vary — states or countries agree to pay a fixed amount of money to receive unlimited treatments of a drug for a patient population. What is it? About the Author Reprints GET STARTED By Ed Silverman Feb. 15, 2019 Reprintslast_img read more

Deutsche Boerse denies merger talks

German exchange group Deutsche Boerse AG is denying that it is contemplating yet another trans-Atlantic merger effort. The exchange issued a statement Monday insisting that it is not in merger negotiations with the Chicago-based derivatives trading firm, CME Group. TSX proposes flat fee for retail market data Keywords Stock exchanges U.S. exchanges scrap political contributions Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news James Langton TMX caps stronger 2020 with Q4 profits growing to $71.8 million Deutsche Boerse says its primary strategic focus is on organic growth, “mainly by expanding its business into growth regions in Asia, extending its services for unsecured and unregulated markets, and expanding its combined market data and IT business.” Last year, European regulators blocked its proposed merger with NYSE Euronext on market share concerns. Several years ago, its bid for a deal with the New York Stock Exchange also failed. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter read more

McDonalds tossed out of Chisholm Shops

first_imgMcDonalds tossed out of Chisholm Shops Australian GreensThe ACT Government has stepped in to block plans for a new McDonalds restaurant at Chisholm Shops. This comes after mounting pressure from the community, supported by ACT Greens member for Tuggeranong, Johnathan Davis.Davis took to social media on Tuesday night to announce the news and commend his Brindabella colleague, Joy Burch.“Sure we’re not from the same party but you’ve got to give credit where credit is due. Joy’s been a massive advocate for this campaign for a long time. She’s worked really hard and I’m sure this is a big day for her”.Davis also took the opportunity to warn his constituents that the fight is not over.“We’re not out of the woods yet,” said Davis. “The Chisholm Village Shops and McDonalds can still submit a brand new development application to the government at a later stage”For now however, the Chisholm Shops will remain McDonalds free. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Act, ACT Government, AusPol, Australia, Australian Greens, campaign, community, Government, Media, restaurant, social medialast_img read more

Press Gaggle by Principal Deputy Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre Aboard Air Force One en route Pittsburgh, PA

first_imgPress Gaggle by Principal Deputy Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre Aboard Air Force One en route Pittsburgh, PA The White HouseMS. JEAN-PIERRE: So, as you guys know, in Pittsburgh today, President Biden will unveil his American Jobs Plan, which will create millions of good-paying jobs, rebuild our country’s infrastructure, and position the United States to outcompete China. This is a once-in-a-century capital investment in America to transform our current and future infrastructure and fundamental change — fundamentally change life for Americans.We will tie these investments to creating good-quality jobs that pay prevailing wages in safe and healthy work places — jobs that ensure workers have a free and fair choice to organize, join a union, and bargain collectively. And we are not going to leave behind communities of color and rural communities that have been systematically excluded for generations. Our investment will also allow us to take on the climate crisis and transition to a clean energy economy.The plan has four parts, all of which will affect our everyday lives. The first is how we move investments in our roads, bridges, rail, and other elements of our transportation infrastructure. The second is how we live at home — investments in broadband, water, power, housing, and buildings. The third is how we care for one another — investments in home and community-based care for older family members and people with disabilities. The fourth is how we make — how we make investments in manufacturing, next-generation research and development, high-quality workforce development, and critical supply chains.To pay for this historic investment in our nation’s infrastructure, the President is proposing to fundamentally reform the corporate tax code so that is incentivizes — so that it incentivizes job creation and investment here in the United States, stops unfair and wasteful profit-shifting to tax havens, and ensuring that large corporations are paying their fair share.The President is proud of the plan he has laid out and looks forward to a conversation over the coming weeks about what we can do to invest in our infrastructure, boost our competitiveness, and make our tax code easier.And one more announcement for you today: Tomorrow, the President will convene his first full Cabinet meeting, just a day after rolling out his American Jobs Plan, which will be a key topic of discussion.The President will lift up his deeply qualified, historically diverse Cabinet as a key decision ma- — as key decision makers and voices for his administration’s agenda and key priorities.The focus of the meeting will be working together to continue implementing and communicating about the American Rescue Plan and how it continues to deliver for working families; discussing the role Cabinet members will play in advocating for the American Jobs Plan; and ensuring we accelerate our federal COVID-19 response and that Americans don’t let their guards down. The Cabinet will be gathered in person, in the East Room, to follow social distancing and other COVID protocols.All right. Go ahead, Jonathan.Q Karine, on the — thank you so much. On the infrastructure proposal: So, on the American Rescue Plan, the President had his non-negotiables — right? — like the $1,400 stimulus check that had to be in there. What has to be in there, in this infrastructure and tax program, for this President? What is he going to insist, even as negotiations begin with the Hill, must be included?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: So, Jonathan, you know, this infrastructure bill is — infrastructure, as we know, has been a bipartisan issue — right? — when it comes to Democrats and Republicans. We even saw, you know, a poll — a Morning Consult poll showing how — it was a poll that they did on a hypothetical $3 trillion plan with — had a margin of 2 to 1 with registered voters. I mean, this is — this is a piece of legislation that is — or a plan that is popular, even in a hypothetical sense.But we’ve also seen Republicans who have been for this. You know, we’ve seen, like, in polling — like 80 percent of Republicans who have supported this infrastructure type of plan.So, you know, we are going to continue moving forward. This is a once-in-a-generation — right? — type of opportunity that we have here. This is about creating jobs. This is about creating millions of jobs for Americans. You know, we talk about the American Rescue Plan; it was a plan to meet the moment. Right? We were in an emergency. Now we’re at a different moment.And so he has said this — and we’re going back to Pittsburgh — right? — where he was. He’s going back to Pittsburgh, where he was two years — two years ago when he launched his campaign and he talked about how he wanted — he was running to rebuild the middle class.And so this is it — right? — when we’re talking about rebuilding the middle class. This is the American Jobs Plan: to rebuild the middle class, to invest, to do this historic investment into this country, and also just create jobs into the — to the American people and creating jobs.Q Is he — is he prepared to go — push this through Congress without Republican votes?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: Well, right now — as you know, the President was a senator for 36 years. He knows how to reach to the other side and make thing — big things happen. He did that as Vice President as well.So this is something that he wants to have bipartisan support. He’s willing to have those conversations with Republicans and, clearly, with his Democratic colleagues, and really trying to work this through because this is so critical and important for the American people.And so — but here’s the thing: This is going to — this is about the American people, right? This is who he’s going to put first for — first in all of this.And, you know, we’re talking about, you know, roads. We’re talking about — you know, we’re talking about highways. We’re talking about investment in this country that has — we haven’t seen since the 1960s. That’s what we’re talking about. We’re talking about children being able to not drink water that has lead in it. We’re talking about, you know, caregiving for families who really need to be able to take care of ailing parents who they can’t get caregivers for. I mean, this is what we’re talking about to help families during this time.Q Does — excuse me, does he have a timeframe on when he would like to get this passed and —MS. JEAN-PIERRE: Well, as you know, this is — so, as I mentioned, the American Rescue Plan was to meet that moment — that crucial moment. And along, you know, with the help of Congress, he was able to do that. We passed that. It’s — we’re seeing already the effects, in a big way, of how that one point — trillion-dollar plan is affecting American families as far as getting shots in arms, COVID response, and people getting that $1,400 check.With this one, he’s — you know, it’s going to take some time, and we’re willing to, like, go with the process and have those conversations on the Hill, which we were already having. We’ve already been having those conversations with Republicans and Democrats. And so we’re just going to see how this goes. But he is zeroed in, laser-focused on this plan. You’re — that’s what you’re going to — you’ll hear him talk more about this later today.Q What’s the message to Democrats who, right now — some progressives who are saying “This doesn’t go far enough”? And are you concerned about keeping Democrats together on this?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: Like I said, this is a once-in-a-generation opportunity that we’re seeing here to invest in our country, invest in America — you know, to invest in the American — the American families, the American people; to create millions of jobs; to actually fix our roads; to actually, you know, have a commitment to manufacturing and all of the things that he has been talking about for the last two years. And so this is what we’re talking about.And so, look, he put his plan forward, and now we’re going to have that conversation — right? — with Democrats and Republicans. And if they have something to propose, we’ll have those conversations with them as well.Q Do you know (inaudible) estimate of how many millions of jobs this plan will create?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: I don’t have that number with me right now, but in the coming days —Q Is there a reason why the administration didn’t roll out a big number like that at the beginning? I believe that they did during the campaign with the Build Back Better program?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: I think this is — no, it’s a good question. I think this is part one — right? — of the plan. As we’ve mentioned, there’s going to be a second plan coming up in the next couple of weeks that the President will talk about. And so this is the beginning of the process. We’ll have that for you.Q Leader McConnell said that he spoke with the President yesterday. Can you provide some more information about what they discussed? And did the President have any other conversations with Republican senators?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: I can’t — I — you know, we don’t preview conversation that’s had, especially with folks on the Hill.Q And is he planning to have Republican leadership over to the White House to try to discuss this?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: As you know, the last couple of weeks, he had meetings with both Republicans and Democrats on infrastructure. And so he did — there was outreach that was had. There’s outreach that’s done by staff, as we know. And so we’re just going to continue, kind of, that cadence and making sure that we’re reaching out and having those conversations — because this is a critical bill for the President.Q I wanted to ask one question on the immigration front. Reporters did just get into one of these detention facilities and the conditions were pretty bleak. It’s at, I believe, 1,700 percent capacity. Is there a plan to alleviate this overcrowding? And by what point should conditions down there be better?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: Yeah. As we have said repeatedly, you know, a Border Patrol facility is no place for a child. And we have been working around the clock, in coordination with HHS, to quickly move unaccompanied children out of these crowded Border Patrol stations and into the care of HHS so they can be placed with family members or other sponsors. We’ve — we even put the ORR staff and HHS staff embedded into D- — into CBP to make this happen, to expedite that process.We deployed FEMA to help HHS quickly build additional capacity to shelter unaccompanied children. We also developed and deployed a plan for HHS to more quickly place unaccompanied children with family members.We are seeing progress, but it’s going to take time. And so, you know — but let me be clear: We are tr- — we are putting out the message, “The border is not open. People should not make the dangerous journey. And we will continue to expel individuals and families.”Q Hey, Karine, is he — is — on the Derek Chauvin trial, is the President watching it up there like we’re watching it back here? Does he plan to reach out to Floyd’s family? Has he had any conversations with them since they were at the DNC?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: So I don’t have anything to read out on if he’s going to reach out to him, but, you know, the President has spoken in personal terms about the death of George Floyd, as you know.It affected him in a way that it affects so — affected so many Americans last year, and he redoubled his commitment to advancing racial justice. You know, he — everything that he has done as President — when you look at even — when you look at the American Jobs Plan, when you look at the American Rescue Plan — has had equity at the center of it.And when he signed the executive order, back on January 6th, on racial equity, he said, “Those 8 minutes and 46 seconds that took George Floyd’s life opened the eyes of millions of Americans and millions of people…all over the world. It was the knee on the neck of justice, and it wouldn’t be forgotten. It stirred the conscience of tens of millions of Americans, and, in my view, it marked a turning point in this country’s attitude toward racial justice.”So he’s watching just like millions of Americans are, and, you know, we’re keeping an eye on it.Q You had said you were going to do part two coming soon, that this is part one. Why should — why do it in two parts? And should people look at that as: These are the most critical priorities right now and this is what the President wants to get done, and you’re less confident about part two?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: There are multiple pillars in this, and one is not — you know, one is not more important than the other. This plan — the American Jobs Plan — is critical, as I’ve mentioned before, and it’s important. It’s going to — it’s an investment, as I’ve said, into the country and American workers and American families.So there’s — no one is more equal or better than the other. And just like the — in a couple of weeks, he will talk about the second part of his plan.Q When Jake Sullivan meets with the Japanese and South Koreans on Friday, in Annapolis, is he going to brief them on the President’s policy review toward North Korea?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: So this was — this was released by NSC last night, so let me just inform everyone what’s happening on Friday.So this Friday, April 2nd, National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan will welcome his counterparts from Japan and from the Republic of Korea for a trilateral dialogue at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.This trilateral meeting, which follows the visits of Secretary of State Anthony Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin to Japan and the Republic of Korea, provides an opportunity for our nations to consult on a wide range of regional issues and foreign policy priorities, including maintenance — maintaining peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and addressing the COVID-19 pandemic and combating climate change.This meeting with Japan and the Republic of Korea is the first national secretary/advisor-level multilateral dialogue of the Biden administration, reflecting the importance we place on broadening and deepening our cooperation on key issues and advancing our shared prosperity across a free and open Indo-Pacific.Q So I — is the review done on North Korea? Is it completed?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: Let me see if I have anything for you on that.So we are in the final stages of our intensive multi-stakeholder North Korea police [sic] — policy review. This has been a thorough interagency review of U.S. policy towards North Korea, including evaluation of all available options to address the increasing threat posed by North Korea to its neighbors and the broader international community.This process has integrated a diverse set of voices from throughout the government and incorporated inputs from think tanks and outside experts. We have consulted with many former government officials involved in North Korea policy, including several from the previous administration.So we look forward to discussing our review with the national security advisors of South Korea and Japan at our trilateral dialogue in Annapolis, on Friday. So there you go.Q Thank you. (Laughter.)Q So the President’s plan includes taxes over 15 years to pay for spending over 8 years. Would he be open to, you know, not paying for some of this — for some of this to be, you know, deficit spending? Is that something that he’s open to if that’s what Democrats, in particular, want to do, as we’re already hearing from some progressives?MS. JEAN-PIERRE: Well, he believes this should be paid for, which is why he included this in his plan.AIDE: The airplane has (inaudible) for landing.MS. JEAN-PIERRE: Oh, all right.AIDE: So brace yourselves, I guess.MS. JEAN-PIERRE: All right. (Laughs.)Q Grab hold of something.MS. JEAN-PIERRE: Oh, my gosh.(Air Force One lands.) (Laughter.)(Cross-talk.)So, Jen, he basically has always said that this should be paid for.Q Yeah.MS. JEAN-PIERRE: You know, an investment like this, it should be paid for. I mean, that’s what he believes, and he’s willing to have conversations with Congress — clearly that’s what he wants to do — and to see what they can offer.But then the question would be to them: Then how do you pay for it? Right? And so that’s why he has the — in this first plan, he has the corporate tax reform, which is a way to pay for this. And this — there’s fairness, right? If you think about it, there’s fairness in this — in this piece of legislation, which is why, you know, they — we put in the corporate tax reform. It’s important for that process to happen as well — the fairness part of it.Q Thank you.Q Thank you so much.MS. JEAN-PIERRE: All right, thanks guys.Q Appreciate it.3:17 P.M. EDT /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:air force, america, american, Austin, China, Democrats’, Government, Japan, Japanese, Korean, Maryland, North Korea, Republicans, secretary of state, South Korea, United States, White Houselast_img read more

Colac Otway Responds to Seven-day COVID19 Lockdown

first_imgColac Otway Responds to Seven-day COVID19 Lockdown Colac Otway Shire Council will close its public-facing facilities in accordance with the State Government’s COVID19 Lockdown advice effective 11.59pm tonight.Council will continue to deliver essential services to the community, subject to further advice, while prioritising the community’s health during the current COVID-19 situation.Colac Otway Shire Council advises the following Council facilities will be CLOSED to the public in accordance with State Government restrictions from 11.59pm Thursday 27 May 2021 until 11.59pm on Thursday 3 June 2021:Colac Otway Shire Customer Service Centres (Colac & Apollo Bay) including library chuteColac & Great Ocean Road Visitor Information CentresBluewater, closed from 7.30pm tonight (Thursday 27 June) (Gym, Pools & Stadium). No 24/7 gym access.COPACC will only open for access to Colac Area Health COVID19 Vaccination ProgramFURTHER ADVICE:Rates PaymentsRates can be paid via phone or online via Council’s website or Bpay. No interest will be charged on late payments if you are unable to pay in person due to office closures.School crossings will continue to be staffed for children of essential workers attending school.Colac Regional SaleyardsThe sale scheduled for Thursday 3 June is planned to continue as normal however there will be limits on public attendance. Only buyers and agents will be permitted to attend.MESSAGE FROM THE MAYORColac Otway Shire Mayor Cr Kate Hanson says heading into another lockdown is devastating but essential to keep Colac Otway residents and all Victorians safe.“We have been very fortunate to have been COVID-free in Victoria for months, and enjoyed limited COVID-safe restrictions.“However it is vital we observe new State Government restrictions and the seven-day lockdown from 11.59pm tonight.“Please look after each other and if you are concerned about friends and family, give them a call, make sure they have access to what they need and we will hopefully be able to return to relaxed restrictions again after the next five days.“You can support local businesses by ordering a take-away and home delivery meal and if you do have to leave home for one of five reasons, remember your face mask.“One of the those reasons is to get vaccinated and you can contact Colac Area Health or Great Ocean Road Health to find out how to book in.“Council facilities will be closed but the phones will be staffed during work hours, and our after-hours service will operate for any urgent inquiries,” Cr Hanson said.“We encourage the community to monitor Colac Otway Shire updates via Council’s website at www.colacotway.vic.gov.au and Facebook page, and go to the Department of Health website at https://www.coronavirus.vic.gov.au/ for COVID19 restriction updates and further information.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Apollo Bay, Bluewater, children, Colac, Colac Otway, Colac Otway Shire, community, coronavirus, covid-19, Department of Health, Facebook, Government, health, local council, lockdown, vaccination, Victorialast_img read more

Four candidates compete in Vancouver School District Position No. 4 race

first_imgFour candidates compete in Vancouver School District Position No. 4 racePosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Thursday, August 1, 2019in: Newsshare 0 Two candidates will advance from Aug. 6 primary to the general election in NovemberVANCOUVER — There’s a dozen candidates on the ballot for the Aug. 6 primary election who are vying for seats on the Vancouver School District’s Board of Directors.There are openings for Positions 1, 4 and 5 on the Board. Previously, ClarkCountyToday.com offered information on the candidates seeking Position 1. In this story, candidates for Position 4 are profiled.Voters will select out of a field that includes Kathy Decker, Lindsey Luis, Lisa Messer and Robert Stewart. The top two in the voting will advance to the November general election.Here’s a brief look (in alphabetical order) at the candidates’ profiles offered in the voters’ pamphlet:Kathy DeckerFour candidates compete in Vancouver School District Position No. 4 raceKathy DeckerDecker is a former Kindergarten teacher in the Vancouver School District. She also previously served as a preschool teacher at the Family of Christ in Vancouver and as a Kindergarten and classroom teacher in Corvallis, Oregon and Fairfax, Virginia and as a English conversation teacher in Kyoto, Japan.Decker received her Bachelor’s Degree in Elementary Education at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. She also lists her community service as 15 years of volunteer work in the VPS classrooms attended by her three children. She has also been a Girl Scout leader, a soccer coach and a Sunday school teacher.“As an experienced educator with a passion for providing each child with what they need, I have learned … every child deserves the chance to be successful,’’ Decker said in her statement. “We know what must be done to ensure that opportunity. The path to success begins with developmentally appropriate practices throughout early childhood. It continues with engaging, integrated curriculum. “Ultimately, the path to success offers older students programs to explore, discover, and create a future,’’ Decker added. “Along this path we develop lifelong learners who contribute positively to our community. The research is clear. Every teacher deserves the resources to guide their students forward. “Successful schools view their teachers as the professional experts they are,’’ she said. “Successful schools provide comprehensive assistance for children with high needs. Successful schools provide adequate supplies and equipment without relying on teachers funding their own classes. Successful schools are child-centered but teacher driven. “Every family deserves the opportunity to be involved fully in their children’s education,’’ Decker added. “Families deserve to know the range of resources available to them. Families deserve easy access to decision-makers: administrators, board members, department heads. Families deserve to be treated as the most important advocates for their children. They must be heard. Every child deserves a champion.’’Lindsey LuisFour candidates compete in Vancouver School District Position No. 4 raceLindsey LuisLuis lists no elected experience but she has worked as a voter registration captain for DoSomething.org. She has also served an internship with Give Us The Floor and also won the Youth Achievement Award for Tolerance by the Clark County Youth Commission.Luis is a 2019 graduate of Fort Vancouver High School. She will attend Washington State University Vancouver this fall. In the community, Luis started the first chapter of the Junior State of America and has also been involved in the Key Club, National Honor Society, Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Atzlán, Black Student Union, and the League of United Latin American Citizens. “Our community continues to grow each year, and with that comes new perspectives and increased diversity,’’ Luis said in her statement. “Our school board should embrace and reflect these changes, therefore, I am running to represent all students and underserved families in order to lead a new vision for the Vancouver School District. “As a low income, first generation Latina, and a recent graduate of Vancouver Public Schools, I have an insightful understanding of the needs and issues affecting our underrepresented families,’’ Luis said. “My experience in our classrooms is recent, direct, and personal. I know the challenges our students face, especially those from diverse backgrounds, because I contended with them too. I am proud of our school district, but I realize it can be improved.“I have spent the past two years organizing fellow students in political actions, running voter registration drives, have served as the National Youth President for the League of United Latin American Citizens, and am active in our local environmental movement,’’ Luis said. “I have been committed to improving our world, but I know change starts at home. Our students are the future of our community, and with your help I will advocate for them to create a brighter today and tomorrow.’’Lisa MesserFour candidates compete in Vancouver School District Position No. 4 raceLisa MesserLike her fellow candidates, Messer lists no elected experience. She has 14 years experience as a classroom teacher, currently serving as a science teacher at Heritage High School in the Evergreen School District.Messer received a Bachelor’s Degree in Science Education from Western Washington University after earning an Associate’s Degree from Clark College. Her community service includes volunteering in school classrooms, political action and serving as a Church youth volunteer.“As the mother of two students at Ogden Elementary, I see the great work done in our schools daily,’’ Messer said. “However, as a National Board Certified science teacher of 14 years, I know more must be done. Our students are changing. Their needs are not the same as in the past, and we as a district, must change with them. In the last decade, we’ve moved from chalkboards to student computers, from textbooks to project-based learning, from spelling tests to state-mandated assessments. The expectations for both students and schools is higher than ever. “As a teacher and parent, I have the knowledge and experience needed to help the district navigate and adapt to these changes,’’ Messer stated. “Our district needs to be responsive to these changes. The policies and budget adopted by the school board should reflect the changing priorities and values of our community and the increasingly pressing needs of our students. In addition, we must respect the expertise of educators. It is our people that make our district great. As a school board director, I promise to honor the hard work of our educators, collaborate with the community, and develop a deep understanding of our students and families.’’Robert StewartFour candidates compete in Vancouver School District Position No. 4 raceRobert StewartStewart lists no elected political experience. His professional experience is as a financial advisor for Columbia Credit Union working with budgets and financial planning, which he believes “will be useful in the challenges facing Vancouver School District.’’Stewart attended Clark College and College of the Siskiyous, where he majored in Business. He has served on the YMCA Board of Managers and has been a member of the Vancouver Metro Sunset Rotary.“I am running for School Board because I believe the most pressing issues facing Vancouver Public Schools are financial — balancing the needs of students and teachers with the amount of funds the district receives,’’ Stewart said. VPS will continue to face funding challenges and special interest pressure.’’Stewart believes the VPS Board of Directors would benefit by having members from outside the education community.“The Board needs people who are independent and have a broad view,’’ he said. “My experience as a local financial advisor makes me well suited to meet these financial shifts and challenges. My daughter is a student within VPS and, like all parents, I want her to have the best education possible.’’CVTV coverage of League of Women Voters Candidate ForumHere’s a link to CVTV’s coverage of a League of Women Voters Candidate Forum held on July 16 with candidates vying for positions on the Vancouver Public Schools Board of Directors:https://www.cvtv.org//program/election-2019AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestVancouvershare 0 Previous : Four candidates compete in Vancouver School District Position No. 1 race Next : Barrows, Dalesandro, Hawks-Conright and Lewis each seek Position No. 5 on Vancouver School District boardAdvertisementThis is placeholder text Name*Email*Website guestLabel 0 Comments Inline FeedbacksView all comments Name*Email*Websitecenter_img Subscribe Connect with LoginI allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreeNotify of new follow-up comments new replies to my comments I allow to use my email address and send notification about new comments and replies (you can unsubscribe at any time). I allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgree guestLabellast_img read more